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004 VISP LabVIEW Quickdrop with Darren

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Quickdrop

In this episode of the VI Shots LabVIEW podcast, I have Darren Nattinger of National Instruments back to chat about his favorite feature of LabVIEW – Quickdrop. Darren is not new to this podcast. I had him on the show back in episode 002 where he gave us some interesting insight to his background and his unique role at NI.

Did you know that Quickdrop was written using LabVIEW? It’s true, which would makes sense since Darren programs exclusively in G. There are also several other interesting and useful tips Darren lays down in this episode, including ways on how to make using quickdrop even faster with Quickdrop shortcuts.

Something that was discussed in the show are Quickdrop plugins. Since 2009, there are a few plugins that ship with LabVIEW. My favorite is the one that moves control labels on the diagram from above to the sides using <ctrl + T>.

Here are the links to items mentioned in this episode:

About the author: Michael Aivaliotis has been working in the test and measurement industry since 1993 with LabVIEW 3.0. He started his career as a test engineer and quickly fell in love with the graphical programming paradigm that LabVIEW provided. Since then, he’s worked on or developed an incredible number of complex test systems in electronics, semiconductor, automotive, telecom, biomedical and other industries. He’s an Certified LabVIEW Architect and a Certified LabVIEW Instructor. He also has the distinction of being among a select few LabVIEW Champions. In 2002, he created the LAVA Forums which have now become the largest independent online LabVIEW community. Email Me

  • Anonymous

    Great podcast!
    I love Quickdrop, not necessarily because it makes programming faster but because it reduces frustration when you know the name of the function but you don’t know where it is in the palettes. The palettes have grown so much over the years and as Darren mentioned some items get moved around too.

    Another thing I like about Quickdrop is that it made LVSpeak possible. The only problem is that I haven’t figure out how to make them coexist so I can talk when on my own and type when I don’t want to bug people around me.

    Thanks for another great podcast

  • Terry Stratoudakis

    Nice podcast.  I like the idea of keeping track of the commonly used nodes and putting them into a dynamic palette.  This came up in one of the LabVIEW Core 1 classes I taught last year.